Characteristics of a Software Professional

At work, I have been challenged with the question “What are the most important characteristics of a software developer?“. This is a tough question, and no matter what you decide to include, you have to leave something out.

I’ve been part of software development projects in various companies. The successful projects teach you invaluable lessons. The dysfunctional projects even more so. Inevitably, a list of characteristics would include qualities I value and desire in my fellow colleagues, as well as characteristics I’d expect them to want in me. (So this is also a long todo list for me. ;)

To get some kind of structure, I decided on three main categories: Professionalism, Long-term code and Quality mindset.

Professionalism

Take responsibility

You are a professional developer, and professionals act responsibly. If things go wrong,
take responsibility. Understand why things went bad. Learn, adapt and make sure it
never happens again. When faced with a difficult choice, “do the right thing”. Optimize for the long run even if it results in more work today. Be a team player, even if this means saying no. Speak the truth.

Know your product

We’re part of a business. Without successful products, there will be no business.
Know your users and their needs. Use your product, use competitor’s products,
visit customers and watch them use your product (from purchase/download to
installation to day-to-day usage to upgrade to uninstall and so forth).

Continuous learning

Be humble and practice relentless inquiry. Question everything (since everything has potential for improvement), embrace questions on your code, realize others’ suggestions might improve your work, be happy other developers change “your” code
(it’s good enough to understand!). Improve yourself and others. Become a better developer by reading books, papers, blogs etc. Watch instruction videos, listen to podcasts, try new technologies, participate in open source development,┬ádiscussion groups etc. Discuss your code and what you read with your peers. Talk to developers of other specialities. Teach others what you know well.

Long-term code

Communication

You write a line of code once, but it is read hundreds of times. Invest time to write code easy to read for others. Write code at the right level of abstraction, abstract enough for expressiveness but without hiding necessary detail. Adhere to design principles as
they capture proven ways to high-quality code. Apply design patterns to better communicate your intent.

Maintainability

Decouple the different parts of your software, on every level – sub-system, module, class and function. Write extendable code, so that you can add functionality with minimal change to existing code. Avoid technical debt, and repay debt as soon as possible. Interest has to be payed on all debt.

Proven functionality

Never deliver code unless you’ve proven it works. If you don’t test it, it will be faulty.
Write testable code. Make it testable from the start, later it will be too expensive. Automate your tests to run before check-in, after check-in and nightly. If the tests are not executed automatically, they will not be updated and soon be obsolete. Without automated tests, no-one will dare change any code. Write fast and reliable unit tests. Write realistic integration tests. For each new feature, write acceptance tests. Automate everything.

Quality mindset

Quality is your responsibility

You, as a developer, is responsible for the quality of the product. Other roles can help you spot problems or give you more time, but they cannot affect quality. Never ship anything without being certain of its correctness.

Find bugs early

Find bugs early in the development process. If a bug can be found by the developer, it should be. If you need tools, get them. If you need hardware, get it. If a bug is found late, understand why it was not found earlier. Fix the process so that bugs of this kind never slips through. Automate.

Fix it now

If you find a bug, fix it now instead of filing a bug report. Ask your colleagues to help out. You will save time. File bug reports on things that couldn’t be solved in half a day.
Do things properly the first time. If you don’t have time to do it right today, when are you ever going to find time? Give time estimates that allow you to produce quality products. Think about what is stopping you from being more productive. Fix it, and then move on to the next thing stopping you.

If you’re interested in these things, you should have a look at Poppendiecks’ “Lean software development” books, Senge’s “The fifth discipline“, Martin’s “Clean coder“, McConnell’s “Code complete“, McConnell’s video “World class software companies” and others. I also provide some resources in previous blog posts (e.g. videos and books).

What characteristics do you value in a software developer?

3 thoughts on “Characteristics of a Software Professional

  1. Also, for FIND BUGS EARLY, all bugs that *can* be found during compilation *should* be found during compilation. A money saver for any product with a lifespan longer than 1 week.

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